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LEARNING LOGS

Learning logs are journals kept by learners, which are used as tools for problem solving and progression. The emphasis is on reflection and the self-evaluation of learning, not simply on simply recording dates and lessons. Their purpose is to help sharpen the learners' ability to observe and document their learning, and to use the documentation for self-assessment and planning. Learning Logs are documentary records of learners' work process (what they're doing); their accomplishments, ideas, or questions. They are a record of learning as it occurs. Teachers can use logs to determine what students are learning, where they are struggling, and how they need help.

The expectations for Learning Logs should be clear by clarifying the criteria for unsatisfactory, satisfactory, and excellent entries. Teachers should model and discuss the kinds of documentation that is expected. In addition, time for writing in the Learning Logs should be built into the daily lesson plan, so that it becomes a predictable ritual. When the learners engage in discussion and share what they've written in their learning logs, their documentation becomes part of an authentic communicative purpose (as well as a reflective one).

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BLOGGING
According to many educational specialists, the use of blogs in an educational setting produces several benefits. These benefits include the promotion of critical and analytical thinking, increased access and exposure to quality content and a combination of solitary and social interactions with peers. Blogging invites more students into the educational conversation, it helps to extend the conversation past the in-class instructional period, classroom blogging provides a "safe" mechanism for introducing students to social media, and blogging helps students take ownership of their own learning.

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